2018 Holiday Donation Drive: The Barbara Laronde Award

Donate to The Barbara Laronde Award this Holiday Season! Support Indigenous Women and Two-Spirit Artist in the North.

Donations make great gifts! Each year the Barbara Laronde Award celebrates and acknowledges the career of one emerging, Northern-Ontario based, Indigenous Woman or Two-Spirit artist. Check out the past award recipients here.

With your support, the Barbara Laronde Award can continue to aid emerging artists for years to come. 100% of your donations benefit the artist.

About the award:

– $1500 cash award to the selected emerging artist based in the north

– Promotion of their work through NWIA networks

– Opportunities for presentation of their works

– Full cost of travel expenses and award plaque

NWIA aims to expand this award in the near future to support the careers of these artists further and requires support from its donors to accomplish this.

If you would like to make a donation as a gift, email NWIA at awards@nwia.ca and specify the recipient’s name. We will list their name on our website as a 2019 NWIA donor.

To donate online to The Barbara Laronde Award click here.

Cheques can be mailed and made payable to:

Native Women in the Arts
180 Shaw Street, Suite 208
Toronto, ON
M6J 2W5

About The Barbara Laronde Award

The Barbara Laronde Award was created to honour the legacy of NWIA Founder, Sandra Laronde, and her vision and commitment to Indigenous artists. It is named after her mother, Barbara, who has been the backbone of her family and a leader in the Northern Ontario community, Temagami First Nation. Barbara inspired her children to be creative and entrepreneurial, and it was with this spirit that NWIA launched this award in 2015.

NWIA is a non-profit arts organization dedicated to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Women and Two-Spirit people who share the common interest of art, culture, community, and the advancement of Indigenous peoples.

Thank you for your continued support of NWIA and the Barbara Laronde Award.

2018 Barbara Laronde Award Recipient

Native Women in the Arts is pleased to announce the winner of the fourth annual Barbara Laronde Award: Caitlyn Bird

Caitlyn Bird, 23, an Anishnaabe Woman from Noatkamegwanning First Nation (Whitefish Bay) who grew up in Thunder Bay, Ontario where she developed a love for the traditional arts focusing on beading. She utilizes traditional techniques and methods while allowing herself to explore through contemporary methods of color, and design. She obtained vast knowledge from her great Grandmother and women within her community. In ensuring the continuation of knowledge, she accepts any opportunity to share what she has been taught in hopes of inspiring others whilst, encouraging them to learn more about their culture and history.

She graduated, 2016, from Lakehead University with her Indigenous Learning degree and now attends the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM obtaining her BFA in Museum Studies. She continues to bead and design daily and believes her love for beading has guided her and “Kin-nan-nim-mig-go” (takes care of her) in numerous ways. She hopes her love of art continues to connect her with her culture and community.

Bird was selected from a number of applications from across Northern Ontario. Artistic Director, Ariel Smith remarked: “ On behalf of the Board and staff of NWIA, we are thrilled to present this award to Caitlyn in recognition of her talent and commitment to her craft. We have no doubt she will continue to grow and evolve as a practicing artist and wish her all the best in her future endeavours. ” NWIA is excited to support the continuing creative and professional achievements of Caitlyn Bird with a $1500 award, which will be presented with Barbara Laronde on Sunday, July 22, 2018, at the Temagami Canoe Festival.

The Barbara Laronde Award was created to honour the legacy of NWIA founder Sandra Laronde and her vision and commitment to Indigenous artists. It celebrates and acknowledges the career of one outstanding, emerging, Northern-Ontario based Indigenous female artist, recognizing the geographic and economic barriers that many northern artists face.

Sandra Laronde’s 19 years of leadership at NWIA paved the way for many Indigenous artists at various stages of their careers. The award is named after her mother, Barbara, who has been the backbone of her family and a leader in the Northern Ontario community, Temagami First Nation. Barbara inspired her children to be creative and entrepreneurial, and it is with this spirit that NWIA launched this award in 2015.

The Temagami Canoe Festival, July 21 – 22, 2018 at the Temagami Waterfront Park is a celebration of Canadian Canoe Culture. This two-day indoor-outdoor, multistage, family-friendly celebration hosts activities that include: canoe displays, demos, and workshops, canoe race events, historical talks, birch bark canoes, guided old growth forest hikes, live music, food and craft vendors, and much more.

For more information please visit: https://www.temagamicanoefestival.com/

Nominations Now Open for the Barbara Laronde Award Deadline June 22, 2018

Nominations are now open for emerging Indigenous artists from Northern Ontario who are Women (Trans, Cis, Two-Spirit, Non-Binary, Genderqueer). Please note that you can nominate yourself or someone else.

Eligibility:

  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  • To be considered for an award the artist must be an Indigenous person living in Northern Ontario (Métis, Inuit, Status and Non-Status First Nations peoples).
  • This award is for Indigenous artists who are Women which includes Trans and Two-Spirit Women as well as Cis Women. This award is also open to Two-Spirit artists who may identify as Non-Binary and Genderqueer who prefer the use of they/them pronouns.
  • Must be at the emerging stages of artistic career. We define an emerging artist as:
    • In the early stage of their career, regardless of age
    • Has created a modest body of work
    • Has had some evidence of professional achievement but may not yet have a substantial record of accomplishments.
    • One who is not yet recognized as an established or mid-career artists by other artists, curators, producers, critics, community members, and arts administrators.
  • Open to all artistic disciplines including:
    • Traditional/Customary Arts (Beading, Carving, Quillwork, Tufting, Weaving)
    • Visual Arts (Painting, Drawing, Sculpture, Installation and Performance art)
    • Performing Arts (Dance, Music, Theatre)
    • Media Arts (Film, Video, New Media)
    • Literary arts
  • Live in one of these geographical regions in northern Ontario:
    • Kenora District
    • Algoma District
    • Cochrane District
    • Manitoulin District
    • Nipissing District
    • Parry Sound District
    • Sudbury District
    • Timiskaming District
    • Rainy River District
    • Thunder Bay District
  • All eligible artists are encouraged to apply
  • Individuals can also nominate an eligible artist they feel deserves this award.

To apply please submit the following:

  • Resume & Biography
  • One-page letter outlining why you or the artist you are nominating should receive this award.
  • Images, audio, written or video support material of your artwork. Please do not send original artworks.
  • Letter of support from someone who is familiar with the nominee’s career in the arts.

Application Deadline: June 22, 2018

Value of Award: $1500 Cash

Award Jury: NWIA Board of Directors  

Our Vision: To support and celebrate the achievement of an Indigenous Women artists from Northern Ontario, and to provide financial support and career enhancing opportunities to encourage their continued excellence.

The Impact: The Barbara Laronde Award is given in the spirit of fostering the careers of emerging artists from Indigenous (on and off reserve) communities in Northern Ontario. NWIA recognizes the specific barriers that many Northern artists face, and we aim to support Indigenous artists by creating connections, professional development, and performance opportunities through our programming initiatives. Over the past 25 years, NWIA has delivered theatre, dance, music, and spoken word productions, exhibited visual and media arts, and published three books of Indigenous visual art and writing. We also present community-driven artist talks, leadership and cultural workshops and youth arts projects to audiences interested in arts, culture, and the advancement of Indigenous peoples.

Please share this call on Facebook, Twitter, and by email to family and friends!

Submit your application to Native Women in the Arts: awards@nwia.ca 

For more info visit: www.nwia.ca/apply

Kwe Performance Series: Quantum Tangle

Native Women in the Arts kicks off National Indigenous History Month with an exciting new edition of our celebrated Kwe Performance Series featuring Juno award-winning artists Quantum Tangle, sister duo Dawn & Shawna Redskye, and Tkaronto’s own DJ Jams.

Join us at the Gladstone Hotel for a stellar evening of folk, blues, roots and throat singing, followed by a dance party featuring hip hop, electro, house and vibes.  

Performance: Friday, June 1, 2018 I Doors 9pm I Show 9:30pm
Venue: Gladstone Hotel, North Ballroom, 1214 Queen St W, Toronto
Advance Tickets: $15 GA I $10 Elders, Students, Low Income I $20 Door 
FB Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/363546617382560/
For More Info: events@nwia.ca

Quantum Tangle Quantum Tangle 

Quantum Tangle combines the wide-ranging artistic visions of Greyson Gritt and Tiffany Ayalik who draw from their respective Anishinaabe-Métis and Inuit backgrounds to create a fusion of old-world sounds and new-world flair. Proudly and boldly displaying their roots, Gritt and Ayalik tailor their music to examine systemic racism and colonialism, while offering ways to empower marginalized groups.

After their 2016 EP “Tiny Hands” won the JUNO for Indigenous Album of the Year, Quantum Tangle followed it up with a dynamic full-length debut for Coax Records, “Shelter as we go…”, a collection of songs that combine deep blues riffs, traditional throat singing and haunting melodies intertwined with hard beats and equally hard-hitting storytelling.

Quantum Tangle was chosen to be one of the feature artists on the “From The North” tour that reached the three territorial capital cities, along with Ottawa, Montreal and Vancouver. At the same time, Tiffany Ayalik and Greyson Gritt’s sketch writing, song composition and musical directing were showcased in comedy legend Mary Walsh’s stage production, “Canada, It’s Complicated”, which toured to 47 cities across Canada throughout the autumn of 2017.

Quantum Tangle is at the vanguard of indigenous musicians transforming Canadian culture, as they look back through history to challenge, educate and encourage audiences to be socially aware. 

Dawn & Shawna RedskyeDawn & Shawna Redskye

Dawn & Shawna Redskye draw influences that range from folk to modern, this Anishinaabe-Irish sister duo weave personal narratives of love, displacement and medicine. Through their songs- carried by warm haunting blood harmonies, poetic and sometimes hard-hitting lyrics, acoustic guitar and banjo- they aim to challenge colonial impressions of past and present.

DJ JamsDJ Jams

Jams (Jamaican/Mohawk/Cree/Irish/multiracial) is a deejay, spoken word community artist and radio geek specializing in 90s and futurist hip hop, electro, house and vibes. Having recently, co-hosted, produced and deejay of The Vibe Collective (Saturdays 6-8pm CIUT 89.5FM) for over a decade and co-host and producer of Indigenous Waves (Mondays 6-7pm CIUT 89.5FM) since 2011.

The Kwe Performance Series is the evolution of NWIA’s long-standing Catalyst Series. The Kwe Performance Series presents performance based work from innovative Indigenous artists from diverse nations and communities. Native Women in the Arts overall artistic vision is to make visible the artistic and cultural expression of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, and work in a wide range of artistic disciplines. We recognize Indigenous artistry and forge positive creative links among Indigenous, culturally diverse, and mainstream artists and audiences. We continually work to explore new ways of including artists of all cultures, men as well as women, youth, and seniors, within the framework of an Indigenous-focused arts organization.

NWIA Announces New Artistic Producer

Native Women in the Arts is delighted to welcome Ariel Smith as our new Artistic Producer. Ariel comes to NWIA with a wide-range of artistic, creative, administrative and presentation experience with Indigenous arts organizations.

 

Ariel Smith

Ariel Smith, Artistic Producer 

Ariel Smith is an award winning nêhiyaw and Jewish filmmaker, video artist, writer, and cultural worker. Having created independent media art since 2001, much of her work has shown at festivals and galleries across Canada and internationally. Ariel is largely self-taught, but honed many of her skills by becoming heavily involved in artist-run centres in Vancouver, Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa. Her passion for artist-run culture has become an integral part of her practice.

Ariel has over a decade of experience in arts administration and management. She has worked as the Technical Director of SAW Video Media Arts Centre in Ottawa Ontario from 2006 to 2014, was the Director of the National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition from 2013 to 2016 and, most recently, was the Executive Director of imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival where she oversaw the 2016 and 2017 festival editions.

Ariel has worked as a programmer for such organizations as Galerie SAW Gallery, the Ottawa International Animation Festival, Reel Canada, and imagineNATIVE. She is currently a guest curator for an upcoming International Indigenous Quinquennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada.

“NWIA is thrilled to have Ariel join us at this time. NWIA is at the height of it’s activity in terms of delivery of community and arts-focused projects, and we were looking for a strong leader to build on the momentum that Erika Iserhoff and the NWIA team had established. I worked with Ariel at the National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition years ago, and was familiar with her ability as an advocate of Indigenous artists and organizations. I also knew the wealth of experience she gained as Executive Director at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. Ariel is someone who brings many skills to this position, creatively and administratively, and combines skill with her vision and commitment to issues pertaining to gender and cultural diversity, women and Indigenous peoples, and how these are supported through artistic practices.” – Kerry Potts, Chair of the Board

“I am so happy to join the NWIA team and look forward to working in this new capacity within the community. I deeply connect with the mandate of the organization and am honoured for this exciting opportunity.” – Ariel Smith, Artistic Producer

Please join us in welcoming Ariel Smith to the organization!  We encourage you to visit www.nwia.ca and join our social media pages to find out about upcoming activities, and we hope to see you at our next event.

Kwe Performance Series: Mother Tongue

Native Women in the Arts and the Music Gallery present the Kwe Performance Series: Mother Tongue, a musical showcase empowering Indigenous languages with artists Joanne Shenandoah, Salia Joseph & Kwiigay iiwaans and Nelson Tagoona.

Join Native Women in the Arts and the Music Gallery for a night showcasing artist who create and perform music in their traditional language. The first event of its kind, Mother Tongue features a range of works from Grammy award-winning established musicians, to emerging artists, all of whom are working to revitalize their mother tongue.

The evening will feature performances by Grammy award-winning Haudenosaunee artist Joanne Shenandoah, from Squamish territory Salia Joseph & Kwiigay iiwaans and Inuit throat boxer Nelson Tagoona from Baker Lake, Nunavut.

Language connects us to our identity, to our past, to our future, and to each other. There is a movement within Indigenous communities across Turtle Island to learn, preserve, and practice traditional language for generations to come. This showcase pays tribute to the ancestors and community members who have preserved the many languages of this land in the face of great adversity.

Performance: Saturday, February 10, Doors 7:30pm, Concert 8:00pm
Venue: 918 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON M5R 3G5
Tickets: https://musicgallery.org/events/mother-tongue/
FB Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/128951257907140/
For More Info: events@nwia.ca

 

Joanne Shenandoah

 Joanne Shenandoah

Grammy award-winning Joanne Shenandoah, is one of America’s most celebrated and critically acclaimed Native American musicians. Her immense catalogue of music includes country, pop, folk, blues, and traditional Iroquois women’s songs. With her music and her work as a humanitarian, an advocate for peace and earthjustice, she has captured the hearts of audiences all over the world.

 

Salia Joseph & Kwiigay-iiwaans

Salia Joseph & Kwiigay iiwaans

Salia Joseph, from Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Snuneymuxw First Nations, is focused on the work and resistance of Indigenous women through art, Indigenous feminisms, and new media. Salia sings contemporary western music in two bands as well as Coast Salish traditional singing in a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh dance/singing group. Salia is passionate about where she comes from as a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh woman and is dedicated to always learning more about her culture.

Currently residing in their ancestral Skwxwú7mesh territories, Kwiigay iiwaans is an artist with many identities, all of which inform their craft. Raven clan, from Haida Gwaii, Kwiigay explores their intersecting two-spirit, queer, trans non-binary, human Haida, and Skwxwú7mesh identities, with the existential, and the extra terrestrial. Their artistic expression is driven by their passion for Indigenous sovereignty.

 

Nelson Tagoona

Nelson Tagoona

From Baker Lake, Nunavut, Nelson Tagoona is a one-of-a-kind musician. He combines inspirational messages with his unique blend of vocal percussion, and traditional inuit throat singing called “throat boxing”. His powerful performing has garnered him the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal.

The Music Gallery

Established in 1976 by members of the Canadian Creative Music Collective (CCMC), the Music Gallery occupies a unique position within Toronto’s musical ecology that allows us to present, encourage and promote leading-edge contemporary music in all genres. For over 40 years, our mandate to foster innovation and experimentation in music has remained constant, and today, we are Toronto’s pre-eminent presenter of genre-defying concert music.

Kwe Performance Series

The Kwe Performance Series is the evolution of NWIA’s long-standing Catalyst Series. NWIA has presented several memorable shows in partnership with the Music Gallery over the years featuring artists such as the 2017 Polaris winner Lido Pimienta, Leanne Simpson, Taqralik Partridge, and Skokum Sound System. Kwe Performance Series presents performance based work from innovative Indigenous artists from diverse nations and communities. Native Women in the Arts overall artistic vision is to make visible the artistic and cultural expression of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, and work in a wide range of artistic disciplines. We recognize Indigenous artistry and forge positive creative links among Indigenous, culturally diverse, and mainstream artists and audiences. We continually work to explore new ways of including artists of all cultures, men as well as women, youth, and seniors, within the framework of an Indigenous-focused arts organization.

Support Indigenous Women Artists in the North this Holiday Season by donating to the Barbara Laronde Award!

Donations Make a Great Gift! You may gift your donation by emailing us and specifying the recipient’s name. We will list their name on our website as a 2018 NWIA donor.

All donations in the amount of $25 and over are issued a charitable tax receipt.

Donate to the Barbara Laronde Award 

The Barbara Laronde Award celebrates and acknowledges the career of one outstanding, emerging, Northern-Ontario based Indigenous female artists– recognizing the geographic and economic barriers that many Northern artists face. Going into its fourth year, the Barbara Laronde award has helped launch the careers of three extraordinary artists.

With your support, the Barbara Laronde Award can continue to aid emerging artists for years to come.

About the award:

  • $1500 cash award to the selected emerging artist based in the north

  • Promotion of their work through NWIA networks

  • Opportunities for presentation of their works

  • Full cost of travel expenses

  • Award plaque

  • Also, NWIA aims to expand this award in the near future to support the careers of these artists further, and requires support from its donors to accomplish this!

    What’s more, 100% of your donation will benefit the artist.

    To donate online to The Barbara Laronde Award for best emerging female Indigenous artists based in Northern Ontario click here.

Cheques can be mailed, and made payable to:

Native Women in the Arts
180 Shaw Street, Suite 208
Toronto, ON
M6J 2W5

Be sure to include your return address for a tax receipt.

About the Barbara Laronde Award

The Barbara Laronde Award was created to honour the legacy of NWIA Founder, Sandra Laronde, and her vision and commitment to Indigenous artists. It is named after her mother, Barbara, who has been the backbone of her family and a leader in the Northern Ontario community, Temagami First Nation. Barbara inspired her children to be creative and entrepreneurial, and it was with this spirit that NWIA launched this award in 2015.

NWIA is a non-profit arts organization for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women who share the common interest of art, culture, community, and the advancement of Indigenous peoples.

Thanks to donations from people like you, we are able to continue to put on valuable, community-focused programming like the Kwe Performance Seriesthe Ka’nikonhrí:yo (Good Minds) Gatherings, the Miiyuu Pimaatswiin (Living a Good Life) Symposia, and the Women’s Hand Drumming Workshops.

NWIA Job Posting: Artistic Producer

JOB POSTING

ARTISTIC PRODUCER – NATIVE WOMEN IN THE ARTS

PLEASE SENT RESUMES WITH A COVER LETTER TO HIRING@NWIA.CA BY JANUARY 3, 2018

MISSION AND MANDATE:

Native Women in the Arts (NWIA) is Canada’s leading arts organization for Indigenous women artists working at the intersection of traditional and contemporary practices. NWIA supports multi-disciplinary artistic expression by connecting, training and presenting emerging, mid-career and established female artists whose work reflects a commitment to art, culture, community, and the advancement of Indigenous people. Thought focused on the development of Indigenous women as creators, our projects are inclusive of youth, men and two-spirited artists, and our programming connects to a diverse participant and audience base, predominantly in Toronto and across Ontario.

NWIA is currently seeking a dynamic and creative professional with experience in Indigenous arts to become our new Artistic Producer. This is an exciting position with a great deal of creative freedom. The role includes taking a leadership role on artistic and community projects, the management of a small team of staff, grant writing and reporting, working with a dedicated Board of Directors, and allows for creative and professional growth including occasional travel opportunities. This position offers a starting annual salary of $41- 45K depending on experience, and is a 4-day per week position that includes paid vacation, sick days and cultural leave.

Qualifications and Experience Required:

  • Strong leadership, organizational and communication skills.

  • A deep understanding of, commitment to and engagement with the vision of Native Women in the Arts.

  • 3 years of experience in a management and/or production in the arts and culture sector.

  • Knowledge of and demonstrated experience within Indigenous arts and culture.

  • Experience in producing community-engaged arts projects or programs.

  • Success in grant writing, with an understanding of the current arts funding climate.

  • Fundraising experience will be considered an asset.

  • Demonstrated experience-managing budgets, including budget preparation, forecasting and reporting.

  • Demonstrated project management, administration and organizational skills.

  • Collegiality

In brief, duties include but are not limited to:

Curation and Production

  • Curates and coordinates Native Women in the Arts projects: performances, concerts, exhibits, symposiums, and community development projects. (See www.nwia.ca for recent projects)

Fundraising and Grant Writing

  • Identifies opportunities and prepares grant applications for funding from arts councils and other public funders.
  • Works with the Board of Directors and consultants to develop fundraising strategies for donors and a small selection of corporate donors.

Management

  • Manages a small team of staff, delegating responsibilities in areas related to their employment contract.

  • Oversees budget, payment of staff, and project related invoices.

  • Oversees, with oversight and support from the Policy and Operations Committee, hiring of new staff, employee reviews, and exit interviews if requested.

Community Liaison

  • Builds a positive profile for NWIA by developing community-based partnerships with Indigenous and arts focused organizations, and liaising with funders, artists and arts presenters.

Promotion & Marketing

  • Promotes and publicizes all projects, events and activities at NWIA with the assistance of the Events Committee and NWIA Staff.

Finances

  • Prepares project and operating budgets and reporting with assistance from our Bookkeeper.

How to Apply:

Candidates should submit a resume and cover letter that highlight your relevant experience no later than January 3rd, 2018 to hiring@nwia.ca. No phone inquiries, please. Due to the high-level of applications, only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Contact Info: Hiring Committee, hiring@nwia.ca
Website: http://www.nwia.ca

Ka’nikonhrí:yo Gatherings: Indigenous Tattoo Resurgence Panel

We are pleased to announce the next event for the Ka’nikonhrí:yo Gatherings, presented in partnership with the Onsite Gallery at OCAD U.

On Thursday, November 16, Native Women in the Arts will host the Indigenous Tattoo Resurgence Panel with Holly NordlumMaya Jacobsen, and Jay Soule, moderated by Aylan Couchie.

The talk will focus on revitalization, ancient traditions, design, health & safety, technique, and the importance of preservation. Holly will also be giving us a sneak peek of her up and coming documentary Tupik: Inuit Ink.

The Ka’nikonhrí:yo Gatherings connect cultural leaders to the Indigenous community in Toronto. Leaders discuss identity, wellness, language revitalization, traditional arts, ceremony, and history, as well as issues that face our communities such as climate change and the environment, decolonization, reconciliation, and sovereignty. Through monthly presentations, based on each leader’s own distinct nation and culture, the gatherings strengthen, empower, and support our community. Ka’nikonhrí:yo means to have a good mind in Kanien’kéha (Mohawk).

Artist Panel: Thursday, November 16, 2017 I 6:00pm – 9:00pm
Location: Onsite Gallery, OCAD U, 199 Richmond St W, Toronto
Admission: FREE
For more info: events@nwia.ca
FB Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/875940665906340/

 

Holly Nordlum

Holly Mitotique Nordlum is an Inupiaq artist, born in Kotzebue, Alaska. Throughout her childhood Holly developed an appreciation for her culture, art, and life in the arctic. A couple of great art teachers throughout high school, (Susan Mason in Kotzebue, and Cindy Yarawamai at Hawaii Preparatory Academy), encouraged and inspired Holly.  Her mother, Lucy, is also an artist and led her by example. Holly attended the University of Alaska, Anchorage and completed a Bachelor of Fine Art Degree in Graphic Design and Photography. While in school she also explored jewelry making, printmaking and sculpture.

Holly opened Naniq Design soon after graduation in 2004. She works full-time as a graphic designer and artist and Traditional Tattooist. She lives in Anchorage.

 

Maya Jacobsen

Maya Sialuk Jacobsen is Inuk from Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland, currently living in Svendborg, Denmark. Maya Sialuk is a Culture Bearer, researcher and educator, with 16 years of tattoo experience. The first ten years of her career she practiced western tattooing, and the last six she has spent solely committed to Inuit Tattoo Traditions.

She is co-owner of two tattoo shops in Oslo, Norway, and has 5 years experience from the Norwegian Tattoo Union, negotiating legislation with the authorities in Norway on health and safety in tattooing.

When Maya is not tattooing in her home studio, she is travelling in Inuit countries and teaching traditional tattoo methods to Inuit women, or working with research and culture preservation.

 

Jay Soule

Jay Soule is a Chippewa/Lebanese multimedia artist from the Chippewa of the Thames First Nation in Southern Ontario. Soule creates art under the name CHIPPEWAR; a play on words “Chippewa” and “warrior.”

Splitting his time between several styles of artistic work from tattooing, body piercing, painting, sculpting, installation work, music as well as his line of CHIPPEWAR war clothing. From spring to fall can find him on the Pow Wow trail selling his art, clothing and other.

 He has been working as a professional body piercer for the last 17 years and tattooing for the last 13 year in professional shops in the USA, England, Australia and Canada.

In 2005, Jay established his company Armoured Soul Tattoos – Piercing & Art Gallery currently located 721 Queen St. West, Unit B Toronto. The studio’s walls are covered with his painting and carry his clothing line and a huge selection of piercing jewelry.

You can visit www.chippewar.com to see his artwork and clothing, go to www.armouredsoultattoos.com to see his Tattoo & Piercing portfolio or book an appointment in this Toronto Studio.

 

Aylan Couchie

Aylan Couchie is an interdisciplinary Anishinaabe artist and writer hailing from Nipissing (Nbisiing) First Nation in Northern Ontario. Though now based in Toronto, she received her BFA with a major in sculpture from NSCAD University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is currently an MFA Candidate in the Interdisciplinary Art, Media and Design program at OCAD University where she is pursuing her graduate studies with a focus on Indigenous monument and public art.

Her work explores ideas of colonialism, land and First Nation realities and histories from her Two­-Spirit, feminist perspective. While serving as director of marketing for The Front Room Gallery, she initiated and lead Barrie’s “Who New?!” Downtown Art Crawls as well as several other events in partnership with local organizations. She’s community­ driven and asserts an Indigenous presence on arts advisory committees and juries. She’s been the recipient of several awards including “Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture” through the International Sculpture Center and the Inaugural Barbara Laronde Award from Native Women in the Arts.

Most recently, Aylan won a Premier’s Award through Ontario Colleges which allowed her to create and establish a 5 year scholarship in support of single Indigenous mothers excelling in a post­-secondary program at Georgian College.

Onsite Gallery 

Onsite Gallery, OCAD University’s professional gallery and experimental curatorial platform for art, design and digital media, fosters social and cultural transformations. Onsite Gallery serves the OCAD University community and the general public.

Kwe Performance Series: Ulali Project

Native Women in the Arts is pleased to announce the Kwe Performance Series: Ulali Project, in partnership with St. Anne’s Anglican Church and Big Medicine Studio. 

The evening will include a performance by world renowned a cappella group Ulali Project, with guest artist. This concert is the first event of our Kwe Performance Series for the second season.

Toronto Performance: Saturday, November 4, 8:00pm – 11:00pm
Venue: St. Anne’s Anglican Church, 270 Gladstone Avenue, Toronto, ON
Tickets: Adults $20.00/Elders, Students, Underemployed & Art Workers $10.00

FB Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/119324072077567/

On Thursday, November 3, at Nipissing First Nation, Pura Fé and Jennifer Kreisberg of Ulali Project will present a free community workshop at Big Medicine Studio, followed by a community performance. Pura Fé and Jennifer Kreisberg will perform and discuss hand drum songs, invite participants to join in, and answer questions.

Nipissing Community Workshop: Friday, November 3, 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Venue: Big Medicine Studio, 161 Couchie Memorial Drive, North Bay, ON
Admission: Free

Nipissing Community Performance: Friday, November 3, 7:00pm – 8:30pm
Venue: Big Medicine Studio, 161 Couchie Memorial Drive, North Bay, ON
Admission: PWYC

FB Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/319680078441416/
For more info: events@nwia.ca


Ulali Project

Ulali Project

In 1987, the a capella trio Ulali was formed by original members Pura Fé, Jennifer Kreisberg, and Soni Moreno. The group really hit its stride with their debut album Mahk Jchi. It seemed like that Ulali was everywhere and their songs were played across Turtle Island and around the world. Soon after the phenomenal success of Mahk Jchi, the Miramax film (now a classic film) Smoke Signals was released in theaters. The film by Cheyenne-Arapaho filmmaker Chris Eyre featured the Ulali songs Forgive Our Fathers Suite (aka Wahjeeleh-Yihm) and All My Relations. Both songs were highlighted in some of the film’s most poignant scenes. The film experienced the same tremendous market crossover and international success that Ulali’s music had. Ulali’s audience went off the charts. Ulali traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe performing at venues like Woodstock ‘94, the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, the 1997 Smithsonian’s Folkways 50th Anniversary Gala at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the 1998 WOMAD Festival in Seattle, the 1998 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, V Day 2001 at Madison Square Garden, the 2001 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City. In 2004 they performed at the Kennedy Center and the National Mall for the opening of the new Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. The list goes on in a wide range of impressive venues and benefit performances. They performed in Canada and abroad in Brazil, Corsica, Fiji, Germany, Italy, Japan, Morocco, New Caledonia and Portugal.

The current incarnation of Ulali Project reformed in 2014. Their first performance was at the River People Music Festival in North Carolina, a festival celebrating southeastern American Indian music and traditions. Their haunting voices and rich percussion have connected with audiences across the United States, and they have shared their music in honor of environmental causes and Indigenous justice issues. The group-currently made up of original founders Pura Fé and Jennifer Kreisberg, along with new members Charly Lowry and Layla Locklear-brings together a unique blend of Native American music, including jazz, folk, and soul.

St. Anne’s Anglican Church

St. Anne’s Church was founded in 1862 to serve the small rural hamlet of Brockton.  As the city grew up around the church, the number of parishioners outgrew the small neo-gothic village church, and in 1907 the present church was constructed in the style of the Byzantine Revival.  In the early 1920s the church interior was decorated and painted with murals by artists who would later become members of Canada’s famous Group of Seven. These early 20th Century architecture and art decisions are the foundation for a continuing relationship between St. Anne’s and the arts community in Toronto.

Big Medicine Studio

Big Medicine Studio is located on the lakeshore of Lake Nipissing on Nipissing First Nation, near North Bay, Ontario. Big Medicine Studio is a 1,200 square foot multi-use studio with 14-foot ceiling height and seating capacity for 60 people. It is privately owned and operated by Penny Couchie and Sid Bobb.

Since it’s opening in October 2010, Big Medicine Studio has hosted four Salons to audiences up to 60 people, hosted a ten day mentorship with an internationally renowned theatre artist in story weaving, hosted a 7-day Arts For All workshop engaging 15 participants in visual, dance, music and theatre arts activities, hosted a number of research and development residencies in new works for dance and theatre, hosted a seven day workshop in Contemporary Indigenous Dance and Dramaturgy, holds ongoing dance,  theatre, visual arts, music and media arts for people of all ages and abilities and hosted many traditional ceremonies for the community in Nipissing First Nation, North Bay and surrounding area.

Big Medicine Studio is the only dedicated arts studio of it’s kind in the region, situated on a First Nations. Built as a home for the creation, development and exhibition of performing and visual arts, it is a place where community comes together to celebrate and engage in arts and culture.

Kwe Performance Series

The Kwe Performance Series is the evolution of NWIA’s long-standing Catalyst Series. Under the new name and with new direction, the Kwe Performance Series presents performances and workshops by performing artists from diverse nations and communities. The events always take place both in Toronto and in varying on-reserve and underserviced communities in arts in Ontario.